Saturday, May 10, 2008

Pangea Day 2008

Pangea Day is a global event bringing the world together through film.

Why? In a world where people are often divided by borders, difference, and conflict, it’s easy to lose sight of what we all have in common. Pangea Day seeks to overcome that – to help people see themselves in others – through the power of film.”

Will this effort make a difference?

History
In 2006, filmmaker Jehane Noujaim won the TED Prize, an annual award granted at the TED Conference. She was granted $100,000, and more important, a wish to change the world. Her wish was to create a day in which the world came together through film. Pangea Day grew out of that wish. Watch Jehane Noujaim’s 2006 acceptance speech now.

What is hoped will happen after Pangea Day

People inspired by Pangea Day will have the opportunity to participate in community-building activities around the world. Through the live program, the Pangea Day web site, and self-organized local events, everyday people will be connected with extraordinary activists and organizations.

Many of the films and performances seen on Pangea Day will be made available on the Web and via mobile phone, alongside open forums for discussion and ideas for how to take social action.

A Pangea Day documentary will be created to catalyze future activities, and dozens of talented filmmakers will make strides in their careers.

Details on the Pangea Day films can be viewed here.



7 comments:

Cole said...

Hi Star!

How's it going?

Just thought I would wish you a happy mother's day.

*huggs*

Stardust said...

Hey Cole, whassup? Long time no hear! Thanks for the good wishes, and stopping by...huggs back at ya!

Tommy said...

Thanks for bringing this to my attention Star.

I've been thinking for some time now, and have been contemplating a series of posts on, the need for some kind of human solidarity movement that transcends race, religion, nationality and so forth. Because, when you get right down to it, the only thing we share in common is our humanity.

Greg said...

Hate to be the one that ruins this, but a majority of the third world nations are poor, thus they don't even have a friggin TV, nevermind a cell phone of internet access, to watch or take part in this "Pangea Day".

Still, cripes, its a start!
Something has to be done to stop this "we are better than you" routine that is slowly destroying this planet.

Stardust said...

Hate to be the one that ruins this, but a majority of the third world nations are poor, thus they don't even have a friggin TV, nevermind a cell phone of internet access, to watch or take part in this "Pangea Day".

Greg, that is a great point that I didn't even think of . . . shame on me. It's an example of how much we take for granted. We just expect these things and expect everyone to have them forgetting that much of the world does not. And these are the places that lack communication that have much of the unrest and warring, etc. I read some article somewhere, can't remember where now, where certain organizations are starting to introduce technology into parts of the world that do not have it yet. That is also a step in the right direction (or could be bad if used for wrong and deceitful purposes). These people would be easily taken advantage of.

Stardust said...

tommy, we can dream, right?

Tommy said...

Actually, from what I have read, cell phone usage is becoming quite prevalent in Africa.

African farmers use them to call ahead to find out the going prices for crops so they don't have to spend a whole day lugging the stuff to market and finding out the price isn't right.